Marine Archaeology

We have a team of leading marine archaeologists who hope to locate Shackleton’s lost Endurance ship. The 44m long sailing vessel journeyed into the southern regions of the Weddell Sea. The ship has still not been found.

This will be the first search for Endurance that will deploy AUVs in search of the vessel. The AUVs can reach sites up to one hundred miles away from the ship, which now means that the crew may be able to locate the ship even in extremely difficult sea ice conditions. With the AUVs and detailed measurements of the ships location in 1915 taken by Captain Frank Worsley, the marine archaeologists hope to locate Shackleton’s lost ship.

  • History

    The Weddell Sea was first discovered in 1823 by British sailor and seal hunter James Weddell who, at the time, was commanding the brig ‘Jane’.

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  • Endurance & History

    More than a century ago, Sir Ernest Shackleton’s expedition ship, ‘Endurance’, was crushed by ice in the Weddell Sea and sank 3000 metres below the surface.

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  • Contingencies

    The Weddell Sea Expedition faces considerable challenges operating in one of the most remote and harshest marine environments on the planet.

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  • Marine Archaeology

    We have a team of leading marine archaeologists who hope to locate Shackleton’s lost Endurance ship. The 44m long sailing vessel journeyed into the southern regions of the Weddell Sea. The ship has still not been found.

    View More