Remotely-Operated Vehicle (ROV)

The deployment of a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) by the expedition enables researchers to collect samples of flora and fauna from the seabed for further study in the laboratory.

Unlike the AUVs, the ROV is tethered to the vessel and is controlled through a joystick by a pilot onboard, which enables it to be manoeuvred very accurately, but only within range of the tether. The ROV uses thrusters to propel it through the water. It can also be used to film accurately areas of interest on the seabed, to take photogrammetric recordings of any discoveries and, possibly, to deploy beacons to assist in AUV operations.

The ROV is fitted with a variety of tools including manipulator arms, cameras and a small push corer to take samples of sediment from the seabed. It is launched and deployed by a winch through an A-frame on the ship.

  • AUV

    The expedition will use Hugin 6000 Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs), which operate at speeds of up to six knots and in water depths of up to 6,000 metres.

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  • ROV

    The deployment of a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) by the expedition enables researchers to collect samples of flora and fauna from the seabed for further study in the laboratory.

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  • Aerial Drones

    The expedition will also use unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), commonly known as aerial drones. UAVs are manufactured to provide an eye in the sky without a human pilot onboard.

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  • Sediment Corers

    Sediment cores are used to sample the organisms that live on or just below the surface of the ocean floor (the benthos), while also displaying the structure of the sediment by boring a large tube into the benthos and then raising the column.

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  • Oceanography (CTD)

    A CTD (also known as Sonde) is a multi-parameter water monitoring system that is designed to simultaneously measure a range of biological and physical properties in both salt and fresh water.

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